Category Archives: Laying Hens

All things related to laying hens. Red Sex Link hens and Bared Rock are the breeds we currently care for.

Mittleider Gardening Watering System

Today I built a Mittleider Gardening Watering System for my new garden. In this post, I’ll show you step by step how I made it. I use this system because of the advantages to watering your garden this way.

The Mittleider Gardening Watering System has several advantages

  1. It provides water directly where it is needed
  2. It conserves water
  3. It waters the garden quickl.y
  4. It reduces weeds
  5. It grows happy plants

Ok enough of that, you are sold on the system and you are probably ready to see how to make your own.

Supplies needed

  1. 3/4 in class 200 PVC – I got mine at Home Depot
  2. End caps, elbows, T-connections depending on your garden configuration
  3. #57 drill bits at amazon.com
  4. and adapter at Amazon.com for
  5. a PVC cutter or hacksaw – at Home Depot for about $10
  6. Measuring tape
  7. electric drill

Step One

The first step to building the Mittleider Gardening Water System is to measure out your garden. Mine consists of two ten foot long 18 inch wide beds and one four foot square bed. Consequently, I purchased four ten-foot 3/4 inch class 200 PVC pipes, Three T-connectors, six elbows, and four end caps.

Step Two

Lay out the PVC and drill three holes every four inches. The reason the holes are drilled in this pattern is to provide water streams directly beneath the pipe and 15 degrees to either side of the pipe. Seems like a lot of drilling, and it is, but this is the magic behind the system.

To make the drilling easier, place a T-connector at the ends of the pipe. Drill one row of holes end to end. Then twist the pipe about 1/4 inch and repeat. Once you have three sets of holes every four inches your work here is done.

Step Three

After all the holes are drilled, it is just a matter of connecting the pipes and then adding a water supply. For mine, I never glue the fittings. You will find that you will eventually want to take the system apart, be it for winter or to clean out the insides. Either way, just pressing these fittings together is sufficient. Make sure you line the pipes up so the three holes are pointing down towards the soil.  The pipes need to be about 3.5 inches above the soil for good water coverage,  I used spare peaces of 2×4 to support the pipe at this elevation.

Step Four

Finally, test the system. It should look something like this:

Hope you found this helpful. Any questions? Use the contact info to  send me an email or comment on this post and I’ll do my best to asnwer.

 

Pasture Raised Eggs vs Commercial Eggs

Pasture Raised Eggs vs Commercial Eggs

which would you rather feed your family?

 

Pasture raised eggs come from chickens that live a more natural life. They are free to roam the farm doing what chickens do. They have access to multiple watering stations and they have a safe roost to come back to each night. Our pasture raised chickens share three nest boxes in which they take turns laying their eggs.

The pasture raised hens also have access to an abundant supply of supplemental feed. This gives them the balanced diet they need to produce healthy eggs and live a long productive life.

Commercial laying hens, on the other hand, do not enjoy fresh air, sunlight, and room to roam. In fact, their living conditions are abysmal at best. Watch the video below and you’ll see what I mean. These conditions are more like a civil war era prisoner of war camp then a farm producing food for human consumption. When you buy eggs at the grocery store, you are supporting these conditions.

Don’t buy eggs from Costco, Walmart, or Sams Club. Find a local producer who is raising hens in a more sustainable fashion. Pasture raised  vs commercial eggs, there really is no comparison in the quality of the hen’s life, or in the quality of the eggs you’ll feed your family.

Be wary of misleading labels on commercial eggs. Here’s what the words they use really mean according to an article published by NPR (click this to read the entire NPR article or read my summary below):

Farm Fresh

What It Actually Means: “It literally means nothing,” says Paul Shapiro, vice president of the Humane Society of the U.S. and an expert on commercial egg production. He says the term is probably meant to conjure up a favorable image in the consumer’s mind, but it has no substance whatsoever.

All Natural

What It Actually Means: Once again, this phrase has no real meaning. Shapiro says it’s an ironic term, too, “because [conventional chickens] are raised in the least natural conditions imaginable.”

Cage-Free

What It Actually Means: Exactly what it sounds like: The hens don’t live in cages. But they don’t live in bucolic red barns, either. They usually live in aviaries: massive industrial barns that house thousands of birds. Each bird has, on average, 1 square foot of space.

No Hormones

What It Actually Means: This term is rather misleading, because it’s illegal to give hormones to poultry, and no large-scale farms in the U.S. do so. It’s like putting a label on a cereal box that says, “No toxic waste.”

No Antibiotics

What It Actually Means: Once again, this is a somewhat misleading term because antibiotics are rarely used in the egg industry. Chickens that are raised for their meat, on the other hand, do commonly get antibiotics to fend off disease and increase animal growth.

Free-Range

What It Actually Means; Free-range means cage-free plus “access to the outdoors.” But as Mark Kastel of the Cornucopia Institute notes, this “access” typically means a few small doors that lead to a screened-in porch with cement, dirt or a modicum of grass. And often, Kastel says, industrial fans that suck ammonia out of the building create “hurricane winds” through the small doorways, “and the birds don’t really want to walk through that.”

The vast majority of free-range birds in commercial egg facilities never actually go outside. So in most cases, free-range means the same thing as cage-free. Unlike in poultry production, there’s no government oversight of the term “free range” when it comes to eggs, so companies can more or less interpret it as they see fit.

Vegetarian Diet

What It Actually Means: This is perhaps the most confusing claim because chickens are not vegetarian. They’re omnivores that, in the wild, get most of their protein from worms, grasshoppers and other insects. Hens that are fed a “vegetarian diet” are probably eating corn fortified with amino acids.

Omega-3

What It Actually Means: The hens are probably given a bit of flaxseed mixed in with their corn feed, possibly leading to higher levels of omega-3s in their eggs.

Organic

What It Actually Means: “Organic” actually means something very specific, and egg producers who use it are subject to USDA regulation. Organic eggs must come from chickens that are free-range (cage-free plus access to the outdoors), fed organic feed (no synthetic pesticides) and receive no hormones or antibiotics.

But as was the case with “free-range” eggs, Kastel says, “organic” eggs are usually coming from birds that live in crowded, industrial aviaries. His organization has created an egg scorecard that rates organic egg farms on a much wider variety of factors.

Pasture-Raised

What It Actually Means: In terms of replicating chickens’ natural environment and way of life, pasture-raised is pretty much the gold standard. Pasture-raised birds spend most of their life outdoors, with a fair amount of space plus access to a barn. Many are able to eat a diet of worms, insects, and grass, along with corn feed (which may or may not be organic).

If you want to read the entire article at NPR here is the link

farm-fresh-natural-eggs-not-always-what-they-re-cracked-up-to-be

Gathering Eggs

I Always Enjoy Gathering Eggs

 

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I have automated the feeding and watering of my chickens. But I still manually gather the eggs each day. These girls average 19 eggs a day. Today was an exception with a total of 20 eggs. Considering that two of the chickens are Roosters, that’s a pretty good ratio of eggs to girls.

This short video is what it looks like when I go great the hens and start gathering eggs. I usually stay in the yard with them for a bit because many of them love to be held and petted. The roosters are a bit stand-offish, but at least they don’t attack me like other roosters I’ve had.

With eggs coming it at nearly 2-dozen per day, it’s a good thing I have a local store that is purchasing everything I bring them. In fact, if you’re eagle-eyed, you may have noticed that I only pick up 14 eggs in the video. That’s because I grabbed 6 this morning to make an even 8-dozen for delivery to Hillcrest Artisan Meats in Little Rock.

I still have plenty of eggs for home use and plenty of uses for them. One of my favorite recipes calls for a full dozen eggs. I might share that in another post on another day.

Gathering Eggs
Basket of Goodness

I’ll get some more video of the chickens one morning next week. It’s just too hot out there in the afternoon to spend much time. Thanks for stopping by.

Here are some other posts I’ve written about the chickens

Barred Rock Hens are sweet

One of our Barred Rock Hens These girls come running every time they see me. Now I have no delusions that it is for any reason other than they know me as the guy who carries corn, but still it is a great way to be greeted every time I go …

Farm Fresh Eggs 

Farm Fresh Eggs   There are a lot of benefits of keeping a backyard flock of laying hens, and I think my favorite is the farm fresh eggs they deliver every day. These eggs are nutritious and wholesome. Compared to a store bought egg, well, they are 100% better. Instead …

Laying Hens 

If you have a comment or question about laying hens, this is the category to post it in. What to raise chickens? Want to buy some eggs? Want to know about the nutrition of a free range hen versus a factory egg? Post your comments and questions in this category …

Pastured Laying Hens 

We have two breeds of pastured laying hens The older pastured laying hens are Barred Rock. They have been a wonderful breed for laying medium sized brown eggs. We’ve had these girls for several years and they are starting to slow down in their egg production. Like the sheep, our hens …

Red Sex Link Hens 

Red Sex Link Hens I just wanted to post an update on our pastured Red Sex Link laying hens. Last week I moved them from the brooder to the chicken coop I built.  I kept them in that coop for a week just to make sure they knew where their home …

How to Make an Automatic Chicken Watering System

An Automatic Chicken Watering System

You Can Make

In an earlier post, I wrote about making a 5-gallon chicken watering system to provide clean water to your yard birds without having to fill it every day. Today I’m going to show you how to modify that system to make it so you will never have to manually fill it again.

Summer is here and with higher temperatures, my chickens have been drinking a lot more water. The 5-gallon system was sufficient in cooler weather, but now I am finding I have to refill it several times a week. With this modification, I won’t have to manually fill it again. I’ll probably take it down in September to give it a good cleaning, but other than that it should be maintenance free.

Automatic Chicken Watering System
Automatic Chicken Watering System Finished

To make this system, you will need a couple of tools and a couple of parts.

Tools:

  • Electric drill
  • 7/8th inch drill bit
  • 1/2in or 3/4 in garden hose

Parts:

Take the lid off the 5-gallon chicken watering system. If you haven’t made that yet – click here for my post on how to make one.

Automatic Chicken Watering System
5-gallon bucket with 7/8th hole ready for installation of the float

With the lid off, drill a 7/8th-inch hole in the side in line with the handle and far enough down to allow the float valve to open and close the valve.

 

 

Use Teflon plumber’s tape to secure all of the threads on the float valve, hose adapter, and hose. If you don’t do this, you will have a leak.

Automatic Chicken Watering System
Float Valve installed

Position the float so that when the water level is up the valve shuts off. This will keep about 4 gallons of water in your 5 gallon bucket at all times.

 

 

Replace the lid and you are ready to hang the bucket in your coup or in a shady spot if you free range your chickens.

Automatic Chicken Watering System
Hose Connection

Attach the hose and turn on the water. If you have a long hose from the house or well, you may want to bury it to prevent the water from getting too hot while it is sitting in the hose.

How to Make a 5 Gallon Poultry Waterer

How to Make a 5 Gallon Poultry Waterer   I thought I would provide some more details on how to make a 5-gallon poultry waterer like the one I showed in my Tips for Raising Chickens post. To make the 5 gallon poultry waterer you will need: 5 Gallon food grade bucket with …

The New Hens are Laying Eggs

Eggs, Glorious Eggs

Today, as I was refilling the chicken’s feed, I noticed six brown eggs in their laying box. I really didn’t expect to see eggs from these new hens for another two or three weeks. This is good news for us and anyone locally who is looking for farm fresh eggs from pasture raised chickens.

These eggs are a bit on the small size, but I expect the girls will be laying large brown eggs by the middle of next month.

Notice the difference in the size of these two eggs. The smaller one, I gathered today from the new girls and it weighs 1.5 ounces. The larger one is from my older flock and it weighed in at 2.4 ounces. But as you can see, they both look amazing inside and out 🙂

Breaking News

In case you are one of those people who things they shouldn’t eat eggs….well, here’s an interesting article for you to read. Published today in the UK Daily Mail eggs-won-t-killTake a minute to read that article when you have a few minutes. The jist of it is that the U.S. government has finally admitted that eating foods with lots of cholesterol – like eggs – does not have an adverse affect on the health of the people who eat them. In other words, dietary cholesterol has does affect levels of cholesterol in the blood.

So, now that you know that…order up a dozen or two enjoy one of nature’s most perfect sources of complete protein. If you live locally and want to start getting eggs from the Ten Mile Farm, we should be ready to start delivering middle of next month. Use the contact us form to shoot me an email before we sell out.

Here are some links to other posts about our laying hens

Farm Fresh Eggs 

Farm Fresh Eggs   There are a lot of benefits of keeping a backyard flock of laying hens, and I think my favorite is the farm fresh eggs they deliver every day. These eggs are nutritious and wholesome. Compared to a store bought egg, well, they are 100% better.

Pastured Laying Hens 

We have two breeds of pastured laying hens The older pastured laying hens are Barred Rock. They have been a wonderful breed for laying medium sized brown eggs. We’ve had these girls for several years and they are starting to slow down in their egg production. Like the sheep, our hens …

Red Sex Link Hens 

Red Sex Link Hens I just wanted to post an update on our pastured Red Sex Link laying hens. Last week I moved them from the brooder to the chicken coop I built.  I kept them in that coop for a week just to make sure they knew where their home …

How to Build a Chicken Coop

How to build a Chicken Coop for less than $180 I got the plans for this coop from Amazon.com they cost less than $5 and were worth every penny. If you want to build a chicken coop, animal shelter, greenhouse, or storage shed, I highly recommend these plans. The plans I purchase were for …

How to Make a 5 Gallon Poultry Waterer

How to Make a 5 Gallon Poultry Waterer   I thought I would provide some more details on how to make a 5 gallon poultry waterer like the one I showed in my Tips for Raising Chickens post. To make the 5 gallon poultry waterer you will need: 5 Gallon food grade bucket with …

Laying Hens

If you have a comment or question about laying hens, this is the category to post it in. What to raise chickens? Want to buy some eggs? Want to know about the nutrition of a free range hen versus a factory egg? Post your comments and questions in this category …

 

How to get rid of black flies

How to get rid of black flies

As wonderful as Spring is, it brings with it a couple of annoyances; pollen and black flies. There really isn’t much we can do about pollen. It is a necessary evil. No pollen, no fruit. Black flies, on the other hand serve no discernible purpose. The question is how to get rid of black flies without creating a toxic environment for other creatures we adore? I have found three effective ways to trap and kill black flies without the use of toxic chemicals.

How to get rid of black flies
Black Fly

First, you need a fly trap. Now if you have ever tried those annoying fly tapes that stick to everything but flies…well that is not an effective trap. An effective trap is one that will catch mostly flies, not bother you, won’t harm your pets or kids, and is easy to set and forget.

how to get rid of black flies
StarBar Captivator

You can make your own trap using 2 liter soda bottles and bait or you can purchase a ready made reusable trap like the Starbar Captivator. I have used both methods and as long as you have a good bait, both work really well. I currently use the Starbar because it looks nicer than a soda bottle full of dead flies and it is easy to clean and reuse.

How to get rid of black flies
Soda Bottle Trap

To use a soda bottle simply cut the bottle in half about 3/4 of the way up from the bottom. Put the bait in the bottom half and insert the top with the cap off inverted into the bottom. If you are using a good bait, the flies will come to the bottle, climb in and become trapped. A 2 liter soda bottle can hold hundreds of flies. Eventually you will want to discard this and make a new one.

Here’s a video demonstrating how to make a soda bottle trap – they can be very effective.

How to get rid of black flies
Fly Bait

For bait you can use a piece of rotting potato with a dash of vinegar. The vinegar will keep bees and other beneficial insects from entering the trap. You can also use old table scraps of meat and veggies, dog poop, or even a bit of yeast mixed in sugar water. These all work pretty well. I’ve found that the best bait for collecting the most flies in the least amount of time is Farnam Home and Garden Fly Trap Attractant. This stuff costs about $12 for a bottle and the bottle will last you all summer. Combined with the Starbar Captivator, this is the most effective method I have found to get rid of black flies. The Farnam Home and Garden Fly Trap Attractant works so well because it contains pheromones that attract flies and it doesn’t stink. The flies smell it but we don’t. I have three of these traps set up and even though I live on a farm, there are practically no flies bothering me.

Now you know how to get rid of black flies without killing friendly insects, the hassle of poisons, or the smell of stink baits. If you are handy you can make great traps yourself. However, I do recommend Starbar Captivator if want a hassle free easy to clean trap. I also recommend the Farnam Home and Garden Fly Trap Attractant in any trap.

I got both of these at Amazon.com for about $12 each. You might be able to find them locally at a hardware store or lawn and garden center. I have not seen these at Lowe’s or Home Depot and I can tell you from experience that the traps they sell simply do not work as well.

Red Sex Link Hens

Red Sex Link Hens

I just wanted to post an update on our pastured Red Sex Link laying hens. Last week I moved them from the brooder to the chicken coop I built.  I kept them in that coop for a week just to make sure they knew where their home was. These Red Sex Link Hens should start laying in about 12 more weeks and when they do I want them to know where the nest boxes are.

Red Sex Link hen
Is this my good side?

This week I started opening the coop door in the morning and closing them back in at night. They have a very large fenced in yard in which to free-range. Chickens generally need about 10 square feet of grazing area per hen. Less than that and you wind up with bare ground in short order. Another option to a large fenced in area is to keep the birds in a chicken tractor – a mobile pen that is moved on a regular basis. Here’s a video I took yesterday of them out eating grass and bugs.

It’s amazing how much they have grown and now that they are getting to free-range I expect these red sex link hens to grow even faster. There are several nice things about pasture raising the hens. First, I believe it is a more natural for them and certainly provides them with a higher quality of life than being cooped up in a coop. Secondly, they are going to get a better balance of food. Thirdly they will debug the pasture. And finally, they will eat less of that expensive chicken feed I have to buy at the Tractor Supply.

Actually, the best thing about pasture raising red sex link hens is the quality of the eggs they produce. You can see some real differences between a coop raised hen’s eggs and a pasture raised hen’s eggs. But seeing is only small part of the story. Pastured eggs taste better and  are more nutritious too.

If you live in central Arkansas and you want to get on the list for eggs let me know. They should be available beginning in June.

How to Make a 5 Gallon Poultry Waterer

How to Make a 5 Gallon Poultry Waterer

 

I thought I would provide some more details on how to make a 5 gallon poultry waterer like the one I showed in my Tips for Raising Chickens post.

To make the 5 gallon poultry waterer you will need:

  • 5 Gallon food grade bucket with lid
  • 4 Water Nipples
  • Plumber’s tape
  • Crescent Wrench
  • 10mm threading bolt

You can get the 5 gallon bucket with lid from Lowes. you might be able to get one free from a local restaurant if you ask nicely. The water nipples are really inexpensive, I got mine from Amazon for about $5 for ten of them. Here’s the link Topicker Brand New Poultry Water Nipples 10 Pcs+ 1 Threaded bolt. Sanitary Water for up to 30 Chickens, Turkeys, Geese or Ducks. The reason I chose this vendor is because it included the 10mm bolt and with Amazon prime, shipping was free. You might be able to find these parts at Tractor Supply or other feed stores in your area.

Here is a video of my chickens enjoying the fresh clean water provided by this 5 gallon poultry waterer. This really is the best way to water your flock.

This really is easy to make. If you don’t have the tools, or are just not inclined to make your own, you can buy a completely assembled 5 gallon poultry waterer for about $40

5 gallon water
Ready Made 5 Gallon Waterer

This is about the same or less than you would pay for a 5 gallon watering container of the traditional style. As I mentioned in my other post, those just don’t keep the water clean and they are a pain to refill. I think you and your chickens will be much happier with this style watering system. Especially if you live in an area where it freezes. Traditional watering systems are difficult to keep from freezing. This system, on the other hand, can be protected with a simple aquarium heater.

 

If you decide to make one of these or buy one, let me know what you think about it.

Tips for raising Chickens

Tips for raising Chickens

I wanted to write a post with some tips for raising chickens in case any of you out there think you might want to venture into a backyard flock.

This post is all about the basics – shelter, food, and water.

There are a lot of really good books out there that cover the information about shelter. One of the best resources I have found is the county extension office. They will have information that is peculiar to where you live. I have also found other extension offices to be incredible resources. If you want a quick reference guide, nothing beats Storey’s Guide to Raising Chickens. You might be able to get a copy at your local library. I do recommend you get something you can keep as a reference though.

Shelter

Chickens are hardy animals. That said, the happier they are, the more eggs they lay. We want the most eggs we can get from each girl, so we want to make them as happy and stress free as we can.

Chickens need 1 foot of roosting space each. If you have 5 chickens, you need a 7 foot long roost. You’ll also need at least two nest boxes.

Roosts should be no higher than 24 inches off the ground. 18″ is ideal. Nest boxes should be at least 1 cubic foot and made of material that is easy to clean. I use a  plastic insert in mine and then fill that with wood shavings. This protects the eggs from breakage, keeps the chicken comfortable, and is easy to clean. Nest boxes should be in the darkest part of the coop. This helps the chicken feel safe during the vulnerable time of laying the egg.

Here is a link to an agriculture extension service’s video on how to make the ideal chicken coop. I recommend you bookmark it, watch it and discover what will make the best coop for you and for your hens. Watch the 1 hr presentation here

The bottom line is that chickens need protection from predators and extreme weather at the very least. My hens have a secure roosting and nesting area which they have access to 24 hrs a day. They are locked in at night for their protection. During the day, they free-range but can enter the coop to eat, drink, lay an egg, or just relax.

Food

Feeding chickens is easy. Chicks get starter crumbles, pullets get a growth ratio – slightly more carbohydrate than starter feed – and layers get layer pellets or crumbles. Chickens are omnivores, so they will eat scraps of meat and any insects or worms that cross their paths. By the way, if you want to make sure that your chickens lay eggs with nice orange yolks, make sure they are getting plenty of beta-carotene in their diet.  Pumpkins, carrots, marigolds, tomatoes, watermelon, parsley, basil, red cabbage, apricots, paprika, corn and the leaves of most green plants are all great sources.

Food storage, however, is tricky. The problem is how to get it feed to your flock in a way that they won’t waste it and won’t run out if you are gone for a day or two. The commercial feeders are expensive. Most of them are cheap

The commercial feeders are expensive. Most of them are cheap plastic or pressed metal. They have a cylinder that holds 5 or so pounds of feed and a gravity keeps the tray full as the chickens eat. This sounds great in theory, but there are several problems with the design. First of all, chicken feed typically comes in 25 or 50 lb bags. The larger the bag, the less cost per lb. Most people want to save money so they buy the 50 lb bags. Well, now you need a place to store that food. A dry cool place that won’t attract mice, rats, and other animals that want to eat your chicken food.  For

First of all, chicken feed typically comes in 25 or 50 lb bags. The larger the bag, the less cost per lb. Most people want to save money so they buy the 50 lb bags. Well, now you need a place to store that food. A dry cool place that won’t attract mice, rats, and other animals that want to eat your chicken food.  For years, I used a metal trash can with a tight-fitting lid. I would put the bag in the can, open the top and scoop out enough to fill the feeder.  Depending on how many chickens you have and whether or not they get to free range, you could find yourself refilling the feeder every day. Not a good plan if you want the freedom to take a road trip or go on vacation.

Another problem with these feeders is that the chickens will spill food all over the ground, and they will find a way to get poop and other debris mixed in with the food. Bottom line, they are expensive, inconvenient, and wasteful.

I recommend using a feeder that will hold a full 50 lb bag of feed. In this video, you can see a video on how to make a simple feeder using a 5 gallon bucket and a few PVC pipe fittings.

I would use this if you have less than five chickens. If you have five or more, you will need to provide more access to the food. I have 24 chickens so I made a gravity feed box that will hold 100lbs of feed. This is what mine looks like.

 

Water

Chickens, like more living things, need access to clean water at all times. This can be challenging for several reasons. First off, chickens don’t have any problem pooping in their water and drinking it. This is not healthy for them. For this reason having a bowl of water is not a good idea. The chickens will roost on the lip and defecate in the water. Most commercial watering containers are also woefully inadequate for a couple of reasons. For one thing, they are expensive as all get out. $40 for a piece of plastic that is a pain to fill, still allows the chickens to get the water dirty and freezes in winter weather.

The best design I have found and the one I use myself, is something you can make yourself with a 5 gallon bucket, lid, and a few water nipples. This is a fairly simple watering device to make and it will allow you to put a small aquarium style heater in it for the winter months. You can get the water nipples here. Or you can purchase a readymade device here. They are as expensive as the ones that don’t work, however, these will work well. They are easy to fill, easy for the chickens to get sufficient water, and they don’t freeze.

As the chickens grow you raise the bucket. When I first switched to this system I was worried that my girls wouldn’t figure out how to use it. Figuring it out was no problem – it was as if they had used one in a previous life. They all went right to it and started drinking. Now the water is always fresh and clean. I’ve developed a method to automatically keep it full too. I’ll write a post about that later.

chicken waterer
5 gallon chicken waterer (picture from Amazon.com)

Here’s the commercial version of this watering device click here

http://amzn.to/1CKCL1B

Farm Fresh Eggs

Farm Fresh Eggs

 

There are a lot of benefits of keeping a backyard flock of laying hens, and I think my favorite is the farm fresh eggs they deliver every day. These eggs are nutritious and wholesome. Compared to a store bought egg, well, they are 100% better. Instead of a pale yellow yolk and runny white, these eggs have bright orange yolks and nicely gelled whites. They taste better too 🙂

If you have bought into that urban legend that eggs are not healthy, you’re missing out on one of the best sources of complete protein in nature. Eggs are also a good source of essential vitamins and minerals.

The breakdown of nutrition in the images below demonstrates that when you eat the whole egg you get the most benefit. If you separate the yolk from the white to save calories you also give up the bulk of vitamins. I always eat the yolk with my eggs. Not only do they taste better that way, but they also give you a more nutritious meal. If you’re worried about fat, cut back in other areas such as dairy.  (rant over for now)

For some really delicious farm-fresh egg recipes check out incredibleegg.org

Farm Fresh Egg Pizza
Yummy Egg Pizza